Exposing the Brown Recluse

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Exposing the Brown Recluse

San Antonio and all of South Texas is no stranger to the Brown Recluse, plus many other kinds of Spiders. Good or bad, poisonous or not.
A San Antonio Pest Control Technician will point them out and treat your House accordingly. Some of these Spider can have a nasty toxin that will affect you for quite a while. So don’t wait when you think that you have a Spider problem and call the Experts from the Pest Control in San Antonio

We get a lot of phone calls in our office at The Bug Man. Most of the time, the calls aren’t alarming. However, when it comes to brown recluses, most of the calm, cool, collectedness in our customers capsizes.Getting bit by bugs is usually not #1 on the list of fun for most people. Our desire is to offer educational materials and partner with you to keep your home pest free. We try to dispel the fear that comes with bugs through our pest control services as well as educational, informative, and humorous resources. Hopefully this blog will both teach you and tickle your funny bone.

Please take a seat in our virtual classroom, and pull out your study materials. The bell has rung and it’s time for Brown Recluses: 101.

True to their name, brown recluses usually stay away from people. They don’t prey on humans, but they do bite in defense if they are threatened. Brown recluses are active at night and will move if disturbed. They typically hang out in areas that don’t receive heavy traffic, such as in storage boxes, closets, and in piles of unused clothes on the floor.

To prevent brown recluses from getting into your storage and clothing areas, vacuum and clean as often as you can and store your items and clothes in sealed plastic containers. And, shake out any items/clothes before you put them on to try remove any spiders that may be in there.

Brown Recluse spider specimen that a customer brought in to our office

It is important to note that brown recluse venom is tricky. The size of the person, the amount of brown recluse bites and the immune system of the bitten one all have to be factored in. Some people get bitten on a Tuesday at the beginning of the month and don’t notice anything until on a Friday at the end of the month. Conversely, results of a bite could be immediately apparent. No two people are alike in the way they respond to bites. No blanket statements here. It all depends. It just depends.

Although it is widely publicized that brown recluses are deadly, a bite from a brown recluse has yet to kill someone. Many health issues are mistakenly attributed to brown recluses because of the hype associated with them. Because brown recluses are well known, they get the wrap for other skin problems, like flesh eating bacteria or bed sores.

If a person gets bitten by a brown recluse, it could lead to a large, ulcerative sore if left untreated. However, if the person bitten seeks medical attention and the help of a pest professional within a reasonable amount of time, the bite likely won’t lead to lost limbs.

Let’s put it this way, if you duke it out with brown recluses with the help of The Bug Man and a medical professional, you won’t end up like the Black Knight from Monty Python and the Holy Grail. “It’s just a flesh wound.”

Though the violin shape on the back of a brown recluse indicates what type of spider it is, it’s best to call a pest professional who can properly identify the spiders and track where they are coming from. We have two approaches to brown recluses: conservative and an infestation treatment. When possible, we try to use the conservative method to treat them. We place glue boards throughout your home to monitor where the spiders are coming from and how many of them you have.

After monitoring the amount of spider activity, we will move forward with an infestation treatment if we need to. If necessary, we will come back for several follow up appointments until the problem is totally taken care of.

Well, class, we hope you learned a lot today. Please raise your virtual hands via leaving a comment or our Ask an Expert page. We’ll see you next time!

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